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Who Sells The Best CBD Products For Pain?

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been enjoying increasing amounts of attention as people learn more about its incredible possibilities as a supplement. With so many articles and research studies being written about CBD, you might think that this consumable is a recent discovery. It is true that many of the CBD extraction and packaging methods use cutting-edge technologies but the use of CBD in its hemp oil form goes back farther than most people realize.

How Many MG of CBD for Pain

CBD vs Tramadol For Chronic Pain

In the 2010’s the public began to see what a profound effect CBD oil could have treating a variety of life threatening aliments, especially in children. A prime example of this is a young family from Missoula Montana, using CBD oil to treat their 20 month old son, Cash Hyde, who had been diagnosed with brain cancer in 2010. Hyde’s condition was worsening and his tumor inoperable. After exhausting every treatment option, including 30 rounds of intensive radiation, Ketamine, Methadone and Morphine treatments, the Hyde family had hit their limit. Nothing had worked. In an effort to give his small child some relief, his father did what was thought to be “crazy”at the time, and gave him a highly concentrated cannabis extract, not knowing what else to do. After the first treatment, Hyde’s State IV brain tumor had shrunk. Although it was considered unorthodox, Mike Hyde was applauded by medical professionals and even spoke with the press in hopes of shedding the light on how CBD oil is literally a lifesaver. Cash Hyde lived for another two and a half years, passing away after the State of Montana made a change in legislation that impaired the family from easily accessing the cannabis oil their son needed.

These are just a few specific instances that show how effective CBD oil can be, laying the groundwork for CBD oil being recognized as a justifiable medicine for a variety of ailments. As a result, many states are passing legislation rapidly allowing CBD oil to be used in numerous clinical studies as treatment plans. Research continues to back up it legitimacy and programs are being funded globally to continue the studies.

CBD vs Tramadol For Pain Relief

Mary\\\\\\\'s Nutritional CBD Freeze

To first understand opioid addiction, you must first understand what opioids are. The term opioid refers to any drug or chemical that attaches (like a key fits into a lock) to sites in the brain called opioid receptors. The human body makes its own opioids (called endorphins) but the opioids we are concerned with when we talk about opioid addiction are those that are manufactured in a laboratory or made by plants. For instance, morphine and codeine are found in the extract (the opium) of seeds from the poppy plant, and this opium is processed into heroin. Most prescription painkillers like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and hydromorphone are synthesized in the laboratory. When a person becomes dependent upon these drugs, they need opioid addiction treatment.

What are Common Types of Opioids?

Opioids may be prescribed legally by doctors (for pain, cough suppression or opioid dependence) or they may be taken illegally for their mood-altering effects--euphoria, sedation, "to feel better", or for some, opioids are taken "just to feel normal". Not everyone who takes an opioid is at risk for dependence requiring opioid addiction treatment, but these drugs are commonly abused.

Examples of prescribed medications that sometimes lead to opioid addiction, but that can also help patients battle other types of substance abuse include:

  • Codeine--the opioid in Tylenol #3, Fiorinal or Fiorecet #3, and in some cough syrups.
  • Hydrocodone--the opioid in Vicodin, Lortab, and Lorcet.
  • Oxycodone--the opioid in Percodan, Percocet and OxyContin.
  • Hydromorphone--the opioid in Dilaudid.
  • Oxymorphone--the opioid in Opana.
  • Meperidine--the opioid in Demerol.
  • Morphine--the opioid in MS Contin, Kadian and MSIR.
  • Fentanyl--the opioid in Duragesic.
  • Tramadol--the opioid in Ultram.
  • Methadone--the opioid in Dolophine.
  • Buprenorphine--the opioid in Suboxone.

  • Denial that a problem exists, or minimizing the severity of the problem.
  • Impaired control over use--using more than planned.
  • A lot of time is spent obtaining, using or recovering from using opioids.
  • Important obligations like school, work, or childcare are reduced for the sake of use.
  • Multiple prior unsuccessful attempts to quit, or a persistent desire to quit.
  • Continued use despite obvious harm to one's health, job, finances or family.

What is Physical Dependence?

A person is said to have "physical dependence" on opioids if they have high "tolerance", meaning more of the substance is needed to get the same effect, and they get withdrawal symptoms if the substance is stopped. Most patients who seek opioid addiction treatment also have some degree of physical dependence. However, physical dependence alone is not sufficient to make a diagnosis of addiction. A person can be physically dependent--such as a cancer patient might be who is prescribed opioids for severe pain--and not be addicted. Again, addiction refers to certain behaviors.

Patients who are being treated for chronic pain can develop what we call "pseudo addiction". They may start to exhibit some of the same behaviors we see with addiction when they don't get adequate pain relief. When their pain is controlled, the behaviors that we associate with opioid addiction disappear. They do not need opioid addiction treatment. They need better pain management.